GOP Candidates on the Pentagon Budget

Throughout the Republican presidential primary race, there has been no shortage of comments by the candidates on their views of the Pentagon budget. The topic has been highlighted in debates, press releases, and interviews, and it is not going away. Unfortunately, the candidates are being unrealistic, vague, or both, about their plans for the appropriate levels of defense spending.

Despite differences, US-Russia still cooperate on New START and More

Make no mistake: we should continue to vigorously oppose Russian actions that undermine international security in places like Ukraine and Syria. But instead of solely focusing on what drives us apart, let’s find the right areas to increase cooperation and improve the security of both countries and the world.

The 2016 Presidential Candidates on Nuclear Issues

With implementation day for the Iran nuclear agreement around the corner, implicit nuclear threats from Russia, an expensive nuclear weapons modernization program in the U.S., striking revelations of attempted nuclear smuggling, and threats of weapons testing from North Korea, nuclear weapons policy is receiving more attention during debates on U.S. foreign policy.

Dishing Out Revenge

“Revenge is a Dish Best Served Cold.” I am agnostic on the origin of the above quote. I am also indifferent to the moral turpitude associated with revenge or retaliation. My interest is in the temperature of the dish, specifically. What the saying cautions against is a quick, not fully thought out response to an insult, aggravation or attack, that too often leads to actions later to be regretted.

Pentagon Profligacy: Five Egregious Examples of Wasteful Pentagon Programs

The United States spent over $600 billion on the Pentagon this last year. That’s more money than the next seven countries combined. It’s also more than every other U.S. federal agency combined. Despite this extravagant budget, the Pentagon is the only agency that has never passed an audit, as required by law. What does that mean: the Defense Department can’t account for how it is spending all of its money.

Former SecDef Gates and the Future of Defense Reform (Fingers Crossed)

The Army JLENS blimp fiasco, the $43 million Afghan gas station, the fumbling F-35 program, the NDAA veto, government shutdowns, the Syrian train-and-equip program, etc. These are just some of the issues that have come up in recent times that highlight the desperate need to work towards defense reform in the United States. And the work should start now.